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What you need to know about Form I-130A

If you are sponsoring a spouse for permanent residency in the United States, you may be wondering how to go about completing and filing Form I-130A. In this guide, you’ll find out more information about this important United States immigration document.

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Under U. S. immigration law, citizens and permanent residents (Green Card holders) of the United States can sponsor family members for a Green Card. To do so, the sponsor must complete and file Form I-130 (Petition for Alien Relative) with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).

However, if the U.S. citizen or permanent resident is sponsoring is a spouse, they also need to file Form I-130A (Supplemental Information for Spouse Beneficiary).

If you are sponsoring a spouse for permanent residency in the United States, you may be wondering how to go about completing and filing Form I-130A. In this guide, you’ll find out more information about this important United States immigration document. 

Form I-130A, explained

Form I-130A (Supplemental Information for Spouse Beneficiary) is a supplemental form for Form I-130 (Petition for Alien Relative). If a U.S. citizen or Green Card holder is petitioning for their spouse to become an permanent resident, they must complete and file this form with USCIS. Form I-130A must be including with the initial I-130 petition (along with any additional supporting documents).

The purpose of this supplemental form is to provide the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and USCIS with additional information about the intending immigrant, such as biographical information. Form I-130A is a replacement for the formerly required Form G-325A, which is now known as Biographic Information for Deferred Action. 

Previously, the sponsor (petitioner) and their alien spouse were required to complete and file Form G-325A with USCIS. Now, however, the I-130A form is supposed to be completed and signed by the intending immigrant.

Form I-130A instructions

To obtain Form I-130A, you can download it for free from the Form I-130 page of the USCIS website. To complete Form I-130A, you can either type or print legibly using black ink. It’s important that you answer each section fully and accurately. Providing false information could result in USCIS terminating your petition for a family-based Green Card. 

Completing the form is relatively straightforward. There are two columns and a total of seven parts, which contain separate sections. The information required in this form pertains to the intending immigrant, referred to as the “spouse beneficiary.”

All parts pertaining to the intending immigrant must be completed. For any parts or sections that do not apply to the intending immigrant, an answer of “not applicable” or “N/A” should be provided. For parts or sections that require a numerical response that do not apply to the spouse beneficiary, an answer of “none” is required. 

Part 1. Information about you (spouse beneficiary)

In this part, the intending immigrant will need to provide information about their self, including: 

  • Alien Registration Number (A-number), if applicable

  • USCIS online account number, if one exists

  • The intending immigrant’s full name, including family name (last name), given name (first name) and middle name

  • Address history or the physical address where the intending immigrant has resided for the past five years, in the U.S. or abroad. The most current address should be listed first, followed by any other addresses where they resided in the past five years. This includes street names and numbers, apartment numbers, city or town, state or province, zip code, postal code, country and the dates that the spouse beneficiary has lived at each address. 

  • Last physical address abroad, including the dates they lived there, the street name and number, apartment number, city or town, state or province, zip code, postal code and country. 

  • Information about parents, including family names (last names), given names (first names), and middle names, date of birth (mm/dd/yyyy format), gender, place of birth and country of residence. 

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Part 2. Information about your employment

In this part, the intending immigrant needs to provide information about their employment history for the past five years, either in the U.S. or abroad. The most current employment should be listed first. 

  • Name of the employer or company 

  • Address of the employer, including street name and number, apartment number, city or town, state or province, zip code, postal code and country

  • Occupation

  • Dates of employment (mm/dd/yyyy format)

Part 3. Information about your employment outside the United States

In this part, the intending immigrant must provide information pertaining to their last occupation abroad, if that occupation is not listed in Part 2. 

  • Name of the employer 

  • Street name and number, apartment number, city or town, state or province, zip code, postal code and country

  • Occupation

  • Dates of employment (mm/dd/yyyy) format

Part 4. Spouse beneficiary’s statement, contact information, certification, and signature

In this section, the spouse beneficiary must indicate how they understood the information presented on the form (by reading it in English, by having it translated by an interpreter or by having someone else prepare it for them.) The spouse beneficiary must also attest that all information provided is complete, accurate and true. Any false or inaccurate information provided on this form may result in rejection from the USCIS. 

The spouse beneficiary must also provide their daytime phone number, mobile phone number (if applicable) and email address (if applicable). The spouse beneficiary must then sign this section in black ink. Only hand-written signatures will be accepted; USCIS will not accept typed or stamped signatures. The date the spouse beneficiary signed the document must also be provided in mm/dd/yyyy format. 

Part 5. Interpreter’s contact information, certification, and signature

If the spouse beneficiary completed this form with the assistance of an interpreter, the interpreter must complete this section. The information provided here gives USCIS a way to contact the interpreter and confirms the interpreter’s credentials. 

The interpreter must provide their full name, as well as the name of their affiliated business or organization, if applicable. The mailing address of the interpreter must also be provided, as well as their certification that they are fluent in English and the original language of the document. Lastly, the interpreter must sign the document in black ink. Only handwritten signatures will be accepted; typed and stamped signatures are usually rejected. The date the form was signed should also be indicated (mm/dd/yyyy format). 

Part 6. Contact information, declaration, and signature of the person preparing this form, if other than the spouse beneficiary

If anyone other than the spouse beneficiary prepared Form I-130A (an immigration attorney or a family member, for example), that individual must complete this part.

The preparer must provide their full name and the name of the business or organization they are affiliated with (if any). The preparer should also provide their contact information, including mailing address, daytime phone number, mobile phone number (if any) and email address (if any). 

Additionally, the preparer must provide their statement (indicate whether or not they are an attorney or an accredited representative) and sign the document in black ink. Again, only handwritten signatures will be accepted; stamped and typed signatures are typically rejected. The preparer should also provide the date the document was signed (mm/dd/yyyy format). 

Part 7. Additional information 

If any additional space is required to complete any part or section of Form I-130A, the spouse beneficiary can provide it in Part 7. If even more space is required, Part 7 can be printed, or separate sheets of paper can be used.

If using separate sheets of paper, the spouse beneficiary should provide their A-number (if any) at the top of each sheet and indicate the page number, part number, and item number that the answer on the paper refers to. Additionally, the spouse beneficiary should sign and date any additional sheets that are used.

Where to submit Form I-130A

Form I-130A should be submitted with Form I-130, along with any additional supporting documentation. You can find out where to send the application for a spouse beneficiary Green Card by on the Form I-130 page of the USCIS website. 

The takeaway

If you are sponsoring your spouse for a family-based Green Card, your spouse must complete Form I-130A. The completed form must be submitted to USCIS along with Form I-130 together with any other supporting documentation and required fees.

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