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The complete guide to Form G-325A for biographical information

Until early 2017, Form G-325A was used to assess biographical information. Today, applicants and petitions no longer have to complete this form when filing for immigrant benefits.

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The complete guide to Form G-325A for biographical information

When you apply or petition for immigrant benefits, the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) assesses eligibility. In some cases, part of that process includes collecting biographical information..

Until early 2017, Form G-325A was used to assess biographical information. Today, applicants and petitions no longer have to complete this form when filing for immigrant benefits. Therefore, this overview of Form G-325A should only be used for informational purposes.

What is Form G-325A?

USCIS conducts a thorough review of everyone who applies for immigration benefits. Usually, in addition to the information presented on an application or petition, USCIS also has to assess an applicant’s biographical information, In the past, USCIS typically requested Form G-325A as part of this process. 

This request was typically only made in certain cases and for specific applications and petitions, such as Form I-485, Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status, or Form I-130, Petition for Alien Relative.

However, in 2017, USCIS updated these forms to simplify the process of applying or petitioning for immigrant benefits. As such, Form G-325A for Biographic Information is no longer required.

What forms replaced Form G-325A?

In lieu of Form G-325A, the following forms are used to provide USCIS with the biographical information they require:

Form I-485A

To provide the necessary biographical information for Form I-485, the Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status, Form I-485A is now used in place of Form G-325A to provide additional information such as biographical evidence to support an applicant’s request to adjust his or her current status to permanent resident.

Form I-130A

Instead of using G-325A, you may use Form I-130A. This supplemental form for Form I-130, the Petition for Alien Relative, is used to collect further background information about spouses of U.S. citizens or U.S. permanent residents requesting a Green Card for their spouses.

How to complete Form G-325A

Though Form G-325A is obsolete and no longer required, you may find instructions for filling out the form for informational purposes below. The questions on this form are not numbered. 

Line 1

  • Family name

  • First name

  • Middle name (if applicable)

  • Gender 

  • Date of birth – entered in mm/dd/yyyy format; for example, a birthdate of May 1, 1981 would be entered as 05/01/1981

  • Citizenship/nationality

  • File number – Alien Registration Number, or “A-number” (if applicable)

Line 2

  • Other names used, including maiden names and names used in previous marriages

  • City and country of birth

  • Social Security Number (if applicable)

Line 3

  • Information about applicant’s father, including his last name, first name, date of birth (mm/dd/yyyy format), city and country of birth (if known) and city and country of residence

  • Information about applicant’s mother, including her maiden name, first name, date of birth (mm/dd/yyyy format), city and country of birth (if known), and city and country of residence

Line 4

  • Information about applicant’s current spouse, including last name, first name, date of birth (mm/dd/yyyy format), city and country of birth, date of marriage, and place of marriage

Line 5

  • Information about applicant’s former spouse(s), including last name, first name, date of birth (mm/dd/yyyy format), city and country of birth, date and place of marriage, and date and place the marriage was terminated

Line 6

  • Information about the applicant’s residence for the last five years, with the most current address listed first, including street name and number, city, province or state, country, and dates that the applicant resided at the address

Line 7

  • Information about the last address the applicant lived for more than 1 year outside of the U.S., including street name and number, city, province or state, country, and dates that the applicant resided at the address

Line 8

  • Information pertaining to the applicant’s employment for the last five years, including the name and address of the employer, specific occupation, and dates that the applicant was employed, with the most recent employer listed first

Line 9

  • Information about the last occupation the applicant had abroad if that information was not presented in line 8

Line 10

  • Select the application that Form G-325A is being submitted in connection with; naturalization, status of permanent resident, or other (which should be specified)

  • Signature of the applicant

  • Date that the application was completed and signed

Additional details used when completing Form G-325A

  • Like all other USCIS applications and petitions, the answers provided on Form G-325A were required to be typed or printed legibly in black ink

  • For any questions that did not pertain to the applicant, an answer of “not applicable” or “N/A” was generally acceptable; for example, if the applicant does not have any previous marriages, he or she would have written “not applicable” or “N/A” in the boxes provided for line 5

  • The form must be signed in black ink; stamped or printed signatures were not accepted

Was there a filing fee for Form G-325A?

No, there was no fee as there were usually filing fees associated with the forms that would be filed alongside G-325A.

The takeaway

Although Form G-325A is no longer typically used for immigration applications or petitions, understanding its previous use cases may help newcomers understand the types of information that USCIS typically requests to determine applicants’ eligibility for certain immigrant benefits.

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